02 CR250 for woods talk me in or out of it. HELP

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Jun 27, 2001
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#1
I am considering this bike to replace my 00 EXC 200 just need a little more power.
This bike is just as light so my question is gearing and adding a flywheel I don't need a light for now.
Will the 19" wheel be a problem if I add a heavy duty tube?
Nobody uses CR's now that race enduro's or harescramble's all KTM's and Gas Gas etc.
Why haven't they converted some to race?
 
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#2
I'm in the process of trying to set my 2001 cr 250 up for the woods. I have the cylinder off and ready to ship to Eric Gorr for a port job for more low/mid power. I've not shipped it because of everything that's went on this week. I'm going to try it with the cylinder porting and if needed add a flywheel weight.
 
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#4
I just came from a 2000 KTM 250 EXC (see for sale forum) to a 2001 CR 250 and here's what I've done and what I think:

Installed
10 oz. flywheel weight
Scott's Steering Stabilizer
hanguards
skidplate
FMF Gnarly pipe
3.0 gal Clarke tank


The KTM has more "snap" down low. The CR requires more clutch work, but once it gets "on the pipe" has lots more power than the KTM. The brakes on the CR are better. The CR turns much better than the KTM (IMO) and is more "flickable" in the woods. I've found the CR's shock much more plush (for me) and the stock forks work fine for my 210 lb. weight. I dropped the fork oil level to the min. and backed the compression all the way back. The SSS also helped out with handling and diminished head shack considerably.

So far, after one race, I'm very pleased with the CR. I shift more and have been getting major arm pump from holding on to that sucker, but with more seat time I should get more used to it.

Hope this helps!
 

motometal

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#5
Crs are great for the woods! My friend bought a '01 thinking he would need a flywheel and a pipe, and he quickly realized there's no need!

I have ridden an '02, and they have a very smooth powerband.

Powerbands have gotten a lot smoother, and suspension has gotten a lot better over the years. Some of the applications for "enduro bikes" have become "obsolete" to where you are best off just starting with an mxer...and when you decide to try an occasional mx track, you will be glad you did!
 
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#6
I have a 99 cr 250 which I love in the woods. I bought this bike after having owned a 96 xr 400. All of my xr loving riding buddies said that I would be sorry and that I would hate the cr in the woods. Just the opposite. The thing that I noticed is that after an eight hour day of riding single track, creek beds, etc I still have energy to spare. On the 400, I would get back to the house and go into a coma from fatigue. Go with the cr you wont be sorry.
 

slideways11

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#7
I would say stick with the KTM for woods use, if you have to have a Honda I would go with a CR500 .
01cr250, 02yz250,02yz125
 
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#8
If you have a good Honda dealer and are willing to put in some time to set up the bike, don't be afraid to go Honda. If you like you KTM dealer, get a 250EXC (IMO the best all-purpose for anyone, anywhere bike made). I noticed you are in Seattle, meaning you ride in wet conditions alot. The KTM will go thru less bearings and probably require replacement of less parts due to mud/water damage. KTMs have alot of nice features such as big fenders and mud guards on the chain that help in such conditions. Depending upon what you want the Honda to do for you, it could cost less than the KTM when done, or cost alot more. A few years ago I set up a KX250 for the ISDE, even with dealer support it got quite expensive. I added 16oz of flywheel to the KX to make it usable in the PNW woods and geared it up 1 tooth to help top speed on fire-roads. The 19" wheel is not a problem, actually you can get better tire selection with a 19" these days (and mousses are also easy to get). I was always replacing parts on the KX. Now I ride a TM and it just won't seem to wear out or break. As noted in my post on the YZ250E, Japanese 250 MXers can make very good enduro conversions.
 
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May 13, 2001
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#9
HEY KTMFAN I did the exact same thing that you are thinking about. I switched from a '99 KTM 200 to a '00 CR250 and couldn't be happier.
The CR needed some work to run the Enduros here in the Southeast-big tank, s/a and flywheel weight- but I like it much better overall than my 200.
Don't get me wrong, I really like KTM's-I've owned 4- but I've never owned a bike that held up this well after a long tough enduro. You can't go wrong with the CR and if you don't like it you can sell it pretty easy.
David
 

motometal

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#11
I have a '01 CR, and have ridden a '02

How much bottom? Depends what you compare it to. I've owned and ridden a lot of 250s, and this one has as much or more grunt than any of them. It wouldn't have more than a bike specifically designed/tuned for low end, but then the CR will walk all over an "enduro" tuned bike on the top end. Also, I would say less bottom end than a KX, but probably smoother.

Do you have to clutch it alot...depends how fast you want to accelerate. I can tell you that I've climbed some pretty hairy hills in second gear bogged way down, without clutching.

Oh yea, you may have noticed that the magazines said the '01s didn't have much low end power. Ignore that...they are full of it, as usual.
 
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Oct 8, 2000
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#12
Porting the bike for lowend

I know youre asking about turning 2002 Cr into woods bike, I just wanted to tell you about the results that I got from Eric Gore. I have added an 11oz. weight and had Eric port the cylinder for more low end, added Boy. dual stage reeds and FMF Gnarly pipe. This bike rocks now. Its is an absolute tractor, feels much lighter and turns much better than my friend KTM's. I may also suggest having WER do your suspension. They did mine and this thing eats the Ga. roots and rocks for dinner. I know my bike is a Yamaha, but I thought this may answer the question about Erics porting for low end.
 
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#13
I think\know the CR250r would be fine in the woods.I just bought a 2000
CR125r and it is used solely as a woods bike.I rode it for the first time
saturday and it was great.I just need some bark busters and that's it.
I did go up a tooth on the front and rear sprocket and this seems to help.
I rode KDX's and while they were great woods bike's,the CR's handling and
lower weight are fantastic.Get the CR250r,put a bigger sprocket on it,bark
busters,and you are ready to go!
Good luck,
89vett
2000 CR125r
 

CR Swade

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#14
If you are a dyed-in-the-wool Honda rider (have to have CR handling) the 00-01, and now I hear the 02 will please you.

I have ridden CR's since 84, except for a brief stint on a 91KX250 (didn't like) and my last KTM (loved this bike).

I had to go back to Hondas though because I missed their handling, power, brakes, and durability. The transformation to a bike as smooth as the KTM did take some $$$ but not as much as you would think.

I spent $$$ on tank, FMF pipe, armour, guards, Scotts stabilizer kit (Magura bars, clamps, and mount) and suspension re-valve front and rear. If you find a shop that specializes in woods set-ups, the CR is very plush once done. There are several listed throughout this site, or the shop that I used locally (PM me if you would like the info). The engine just needed careful set-up to make it useable. It actually is a tractor on snotty hills, but can fly @ WFO.

It should be noted that I had done all of these mods to my KTM except for the big tank. Yes even the Katoom needs suspension work. Total costs? Bike plus about 2K. And I will do it all over again with the 450 in a heartbeat.