Advice for riding tight woods

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Nov 13, 2002
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#1
Can anyone give pointers for riding tight woods. They slow me down a lot during an enduro and I find them very tiring. I'm trying to use engine braking and lay off the front brake, I think thats made me a little faster. I've also seen riders sliding there rear tire into a turn. How do you do that? I can't get the rear to slide.
 

Smit-Dog

Mi. Trail Riders
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#2
Not that I'm very good at it, but hit the rear brake hard just as you're about to turn, at the same time un-weight the rear of the bike to "brake slide" around the corner. I find it easier to un-weight the rear end when standing; just lean forward over the handle bars, and use your legs to help kick out and control the way the rear end slides.

When the bike is pointed in the right direction, get off the brake and get on the gas.

Now if I could only follow my own advice!
 
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#3
Its easy, all you do is get a reasnable speed, pull in the clutch, lean the bike over a little to the side you are turning and lock the brakes on and at the same time try and push the back out with your legs/ass.

After that, relese the clutch and take off.
 

CaptainObvious

Formally known as RV6Junkie
Damn Yankees
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#4
Look for ANYTHING to use as a berm. Roots, rock, ruts...they'll all help you out.
 
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#5
gxdragon.

Smitt-Dog nailed it pretty good.

Stand on the pegs and get as far forward over the bars as you can when you enter the corner. Try to be smooth. It you brake too hard and have to come to almost a complete stop then have to accelerate out of the corner, you will lose time and wear yourself out.

When you come into the tight cornners, reduce your speed using both brakes until you get to the apex of the corner. Then, tap or drag your rear brake just enough to allow the rear to slide around the corner. BEFORE, you are completly around the corner, start coming on with the gas to keep the rear wheel sliding until you are out of the turn.

One of the most important things to remember is, LOOK WHERE YOU WANT TO GO. When you are entering the corner or in the corner, you should already be looking out of the corner at where you want to go.

Hope this helps. :thumb:
 
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#6
Thanks guys, I will definitely try it at the scrub pine enduro. I think I brake too hard coming into the turns so I don't have the momentum to slide the rear tire. Do you have to pull the clutch in while doing this to keep the bike from stalling or if done right you don't have this problem?

How about tight trees where you have to keep shifting the bike side to side to get through the trees? is there any secret to that or just practice?
 

Smit-Dog

Mi. Trail Riders
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#7
I believe that sub-consciously I pull in the clutch so that the bike doesn't stall. Also allows you to slip the clutch to transition between brake sliding and power sliding.

As far as tight trees, I like to stand up and keep both feet on the pegs. You have a lot of leverage while standing on the pegs, and along with your legs/knees, can use body english to finesse the bike through some really tight stuff. Think trials riding.
 

RM_guy

Moderator /
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#8
This is all good advice but the ultimate solution is to bring a chain saw into the woods and start cuttin' ;)