Should my girlfriend ride?

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#1
My fiancee has sudenly decided that she is tired of sitting around and just watching. Now don't get mad because i'm not against women riding or anything. It's just that she is pretty small (5'9" and about110). I'm worried that she wouldn't be able to pick it up or hardly even ride it. She is kind of girly and I don't personally see her riding, but maybe. If you do think she should try what should she ride? If it matters I have a 97 YZ250
 

firecracker22

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#2
It's entirely her decision and you should help her in any way you can. If you don't think she can ride, she will pick up on that. If she thinks she can, she will give it everything she's got.

As far as what bike, DON'T do what every other well meaning boyfriend does and immediately put her on a heavy electric start bike. I don't know why this happens but it does. It is far easier to learn how to kick than it is to pick up a 260-lb TTR or DRZ, and there will be lots of picking up to do as a beginner. Try a KDX or a 125 of some type--depending on what she feels comfortable on. The standard "beginner" bikes like TT-R 125s and XR 200s might be too short for her if she's 5'9".

Can't women be "girly" and ride? I curl my hair and paint my nails.
 
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#3
Girly women riders are the best kind. I immediately thought of a KX 100. Its very easy to kick, pick-up, and it's cute!;)
 

TexKDX

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#4
A KX100 would let he stand flat-footed, a confidence booster. The KX100 also has a power valve which gives it more than just 20cc's worth of low end over an 80. To FC22's point, this lighter bike versus say a "starter" bike like the TTR250 or DR250 may make here alot more comfortable, especially considering her wingnut weight status.

WHATEVER you put her on, get a spare throttle housing and drill it for a throttle stop screw. Nothing worse than throwing her weight back, accidently twisting on WFO, and losing control. Just take a good look at the housing and drill a hole in it in the right spot to put a little screw in it to stop the cable holder. 1/4 throttle is a good starting place. You can drill another hole at half throttle when she gets better, then 3/4.

Also, for the first "ride", leave the motor off and push her around the block so she can get the feel for the brakes before she has to deal with them and the throttle. It may look stupid, but this is an effective technique for getting her started. When she is finally using the motor, be sure you are in an open area and there is nothing for her to hit. If there is one thing within 200 feet, she'll probably hit it.

Finally, make sure she has decent gear on. Boots over the ankles, legs and arms covered (jeans and sweatshirt are OK), helmet and gloves. A simple tipover can get nasty if the bike lands on her and the exhaust or engine makes contact with her leg.

Can she drive a stick shift car? Is she a sissy girl or a toughy girl? My wife is a sissy girl who thinks she is a toughy girl. 100 feet on a motorcycle was all it took to make the distinction for her unfortunately. Makes a decent passenger now though.
 
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#5
I found out the hard way... let someone else (you trust) teach her to ride. I was so worried about Scooter falling off, I pretty much scared the tar out of her before she even got rolling :silly: .
 

firecracker22

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#6
A lot of women are also more comfortable around someone they aren't involved in . . . just the way it is, no offense to you. Another woman who rides would be ideal.

Another good learning tactic is to have her stand next to the bike,walk beside it, and let the clutch in and out. That is what they do with beginners in MSF school and it's a good way to learn clutch control without worrying about falling down too. And get her to start practicing good body position NOW, not later when it's a bad habit!
 

kmccune

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#7
I guess that should be up to her. Bikes are available to fit 3 year olds to jolly green giants, she can pick one of them up! Go with it and you will have a built in riding partner!:)

Kevin
 
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#8
Seh actually prefers a stickshift car. she sounds similar to Tex's wife. I didn't think about the KX100 thanks guys. I was thinking a TTR125 I wouldn't be suprized if she changes her mind on the first ride.
 

firecracker22

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#9
Geez, give her a chance! You might be surprised! And gain one of the best riding partners of your life. (after you get past the "You *&$%# Jerk, I can't believe you led me down this trail! This *#@&$ sucks! You and your @#(%@^ trail can bite my ass!" stage, anyway. Be patient, this stage is short.)
 

TexKDX

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#10
The TTR would definately be a friendlier bike than the angry-sounding KX100 for the first few rides. And, after she moves up to something else, you can make a great backyard MX bike out of it!

Wifie has driven nothing but sticks since her first super beetle at 16, except for a brief period between sticks while piloting a Volvo 240 wagon auto. The twist throttle is something we take for granted, permanently hard wired into our brains since that first spin around a field at age 7 on a Briggs and Stratton-powered conglomeration of mild steel tubing AKA a mini-bike.

4 wheelers and PWCs come with thumb throttles for a reason. That have-a-friend thing is one of the top 5 suggestions given here. It ranks right up there with the throttle stop and having nothing around for her to hit.
 

NVR FNSH

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#11
Spend the money & send her to an MSF course - yeah, it's for the street but basic controlls are the same and she's not having to deal with reading the terrain. That and they provide the bike (some of them at least).

When my wife moved into my house she had never fired a gun - I have several and felt that she should know how to use them. Smartest thing I did was send her to a handgun safety/training class taught by a Police Instructor. She enjoyed the class, learned a lot & we didn't get divorced.

Brian
 

wayneo426

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#12
I agree with everyone else. She should first learn in a MSF course. You will have plenty of time for input in the future. I can remember trying to teach my wife how to hit a golf ball, and after 2 months of trying she hung up those clubs, and almost hung a 3iron around my neck.....:eek: Give her some time to learn, and you will both be better off.
 

LoriKTM

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#13
She's too small?? Sheesh, I'm only 5' 3", I'd better just sell my bike and give it up, then. :silly:

You sound like you're ready to give up on her. Give her a chance, if she wants! Whatever you do, don't put her on your YZ!! If you don't want to spend the money, find someone with a TTR125 or XR200 that she can try out to see if she even likes it. The TTRs are small and un-intimidating. (Maybe too small for her size).
The MSF class is an excellent idea-- they provide the bikes, and she can learn to ride in a comfortable setting. When she gets done with the class, if she's still interested you can look at getting her a small dirt bike of her own.
 

WoodsRider

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#14
MSF class, only if SHE wants to learn how to ride. There were several women in the class I took 6 years ago. Three of them were there because their significant other wanted them to learn how to ride. All three were in the bottom of the class and one even failed. :silly:

I'm smart enough to know that I should never teach my wife anything, again. Someday I'll tell you about the skiing trip to hell. :p
 

firecracker22

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#15
Or, of course, you could check to see if there's a Debbie Matthews women's mx school nearby. Most of them (to my knowledge) break up students according to skill and in the one I took, there was one gal who'd been on a bike only once or twice, and they took her aside and worked with the basics of shifting, braking, etc. She never even made it to the track but she said she learned a lot. Before the class started the teacher instructed us to go and ride around the track and I saw her and her husband getting pretty annoyed with each other. It's very hard to teach your significant other.