TTR125L Suspension

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Apr 17, 2001
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#1
I recently bought a 2001 TTR125L and changed out the springs front and rear to BBR's setup, but I need to know how to set the sag for the rear. First time out was way too soft and secont time out was way too stiff. I hear there is a standard setup regardless of weight as to how much sag you should have.

the manual says the stock coil over spring can be between 155 and 175mm. but that doesnt help with sag. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

I was too stiff in the rear and soft up front... but I am thinking that I was bottoming out the forks because the rear was too stiff... forcing all the travel to the front.

thanx in advance... I'm hoping to get this setup and make it out to Hollister this weekend... for all you N. CA riders if you want to get together for a ride. I will be with my 10 year old with his XR80... we're both learning so I wont be able to take off too much.

Any riders in the area with riding kids want to get together for a ride?
 

ACS

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#2
Its a little bit of hit and miss. I think about 95 mm is about right for the rear. The BBR rear spring is "tight" at the start but put a lot of riding on it and it softens a bit. I think I adjusted the rear about 20 times before Ryan was happy and its about 90mm sag for his weight now. He rides it on MX so it needs to be a bit firmer than it would for fun riding
 

Vic

***** freak.
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#3
I'm surprised you can get the bike to turn with 90mm of sag. Ideally, the sag should be 50-60mm.
 

ACS

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#4
Vic

Ryan weighs in at 45kg dripping wet. Thats how we get away with the sag at that. Hes a kid who races a kids bike.:)
 
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#5
Bulldog,

My son and I are usually up at Hollister Hills on the weekends...seeing how we only live a few miles away. If your interested maybe we can hook up and ride...that is if I can pull my son away from the MX track. My son currently is riding a TTR-125 with BBR mods. The bike is only a few months old and already he wants the YZ80. His friends are all into racing up at the GP track (above Hollister Hills). Went up and watched him practiced last weekend...scared the @@!$!! out of me just watching him.

But back to the subject, my son and I'll should be up there this Sat (and probably Sun) so if you want to ride together drop me a line. Just look for a white 1976 white Chevy truck with a black hood...can't miss it...its the one with the rust!
 

stormer94

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#6
Hate to sound like a rookie, but "sag" is what? It sounds like something to do with ride height. How is it measured?

I'm doing the BBR spring thing to my sons TTR125 on Wednesday. So I'm trying to bone up on the process. He's 12, and 5' 5" weighs about 160 in his gear.

To further complicate matters, I need to make sure we get it dialed in just about the first time. He's gonna get to be in his first race on Saturday. The REAL bummer is we've been going to the track every week for quite a while, he's gotten used to the suspension he has. I'm hoping it will still fly well, he has a tendency to fly nose low because he chops the throttle before he leaves the ground. (I'm working on it ):)

I've been racing stuff since I could drive, and this is his first motocross race. (Proud dad is pretty excited for him). I may not even race, just so I can help out if need be. Daughter's first race on the xr50 as well. I'll be a busy guy this weekend.

Thanks for the tips,
Bob
 

stormer94

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#7
From other things I've been involved in, it's usually the shock bushings that squeak. Take the shock off, or bushings out (if that's possible), clean off the dirt, put some light lube on 'em and I bet it quits. A little dirt on your shock bushings (beause of the oil) is better than a squeaky shock.
 

stormer94

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#8
I suppose it depends on the bushing material and the oil. Squeaking is a harmonic relating to friction. Something has to rub against something else to squeak.