XR200 Hop up kits...suspension, plastics, etc...

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#1
I was wondering if you can put CR80 forks on an XR200, I know you can do it on a TTR125l, and if you can, do you have to get a new shock/swingarm assembly for the XR? Can you get new plastics for an XR in order to make it, er, less like an XR and more two stroke like? (Such as non-square side pannels, more aggressive style front fender, etc...) Thanks
 

Mark C.

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#3
Originally posted by Blinkme7182
I was wondering if you can put CR80 forks on an XR200, I know you can do it on a TTR125l, and if you can, do you have to get a new shock/swingarm assembly for the XR? Can you get new plastics for an XR in order to make it, er, less like an XR and more two stroke like? (Such as non-square side pannels, more aggressive style front fender, etc...) Thanks
Why would you wanna do that???:think
 
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#4
You can put 125 forks on the bike. CR80R forks will be too short as well as you would have to fun a smaller front wheel. I don't think you can change plastics that much. You could try putting it the engine in a different frame, but that is very involved.
 
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#5
so...

If I did put a CR125 forks/front wheel on it, would I have to reaiise the back end to compensate for the longer front forks? Thanks
 
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#6
The conversion is not easy. It's actually easier to throw the 200 engine in a 125 chassis - but that is still $$ and takes lots of skill.

Then the engine is wimpy compared to what the chassis can do.

Want to make the XR feel like a CR? Plan on spending at least $4000 to do it (including some engine mods). This is IF you can do the welding/fab work yourself.

Now, back to the real world - here's places to get bolt on's etc for the XR200:

Graphics - N-style still makes nice looking ones. You can also use the XR250 stuff - cut it down.

Front Fender - Acerbis universal

Tank - Nothing available aftermarket

Rear Fender - Nothing available aftermarket

Ceet - can make a custom seat cover for the XR200 in any of their designs (non slip, gripper, etc) for around $140.

Works - Real rear shock - set ya back $400 to $600. It makes a difference. Still not as good as an XR250 though.

Progressive - Heavier fork springs - $80.00. A definite gain and good bang for the buck.

Rear Excel Rim & relace - relace to fit a REAL 18" rear tire. Cost about $400 with new tire - less if you purchase the spokes and do your own relacing work.

Powroll 218cc stroker engine - No other engine mod you can do to the 200 will compare. Cost $500 to $1,200 depending on how much you want to do and what shape the engine's in.

I've owned a bike set up similarly to the list above. I'm in the industry, so it didn't cost me nearly as much as the retail prices listed above. If I had to pay retail for the stuff, I would have NEVER done it.

Bottom line? Unless you're really short, or want the ultimate woods play bike, buy something else.

Want pictures? There's a few here

www.powroll.com it's on their XR200 page.

Hope this helps you out.
 
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#7
If you have an older XR200R (1981-1990) with the better suspension, the 125 forks go on with only custom spacers in the stem and other stuff. There isn't too much you can do to the bike without spending a fortune. Why not just get an XR250R.
 
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#9
I'm 5'4" tall and a wimp. The XR250 isn't any tougher to deal with, unless it's on the ground - in which case it does take a little more to lift it up.

Good news? it's not on the ground as much as the XR200 was, it's just a better bike, better suspension, better powerplant. Feels lighter and more nimble in the tight stuff.

Unless you're slogging thru the mud on the east coast, the XR250 (1997 & newer) will probably be a better option.

If you're worried about weight, the XR200 is a tank too!
 

firecracker22

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#10
You want light? Get a two-stroke!

Okay, here's my opinion. I had an XR 200 for a year. Removed the exhaust baffles, K & N filter, larger (52) rear sprocket. It got along a little faster than it did stock but I decided the wimpy suspension and brakes were just not doing it for me and I didn't have the money for conversions (as much as I like the 3 BBRs I have ridden . . . :) ).

If I were you, I'd buy a new bike. I'd go 2-stroke. All the crap I always heard about how 2-strokes are bad trail bikes, and hard to ride, and require more maintenance, isn't exactly true. Yes, they are harder to ride . . . but WAY more fun. If you do more trail riding, I'd recommend a KDX 200 or KTM 200. Depending on how much you want to spend, that is. The KDXs have been around forever, have many aftermarket parts available, and aren't as aggressive as a 125 or 250 MX bike. They are also very cheap. They are heavy but not any heavier than your XR; they'll be about the same. They do have a different center of gravity so it will feel different. The KTM, which is what I bought, is an incredibly fast woods race bike. It is NOT a trail bike. It is more expensive but not when you consider all the aftermarket things you would put on any other bike to make it compare. It has all the bottom end of a 250 and responds like a 125. The suspension, ergonomics, and brakes are incredible.

If height bothers you, you will get used to it. I always thought I didn't want a full-size bike but now that I'm used to it, I like it. There is always a high spot to put my foot on. The larger wheels and additional ground clearance make a big difference. It took some getting used to, but so does any new bike.

The good thing about XRs is they have great resale value! You can get a really good price for yours even if it's not pretty. I got $1800 for my 93 with a blue seat cover, no graphics and all white plastic.

Just my $.02!
 
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#11
ktm125EXC

I am now seriously considering the KTM125EXC...there's a 95 an hour away from me selling for $2000, and I'm going down tomorrow to take a look at it. According to some Japanese sight I pulled up, the seat height of the 95 125EXC is 890mm (35.5")...pretty low if you ask me. Anyway, I've heard the KTM EXC's are great trail machines, and after watching some enduro races through the very trails I ride, 75% of the bikes were KTM's, including the leader, which further validates this point.
Marc
 

firecracker22

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#12
I would ask your dealer how difficult to obtain parts are for that year and model. 95 is old for a bike, which shouldn't matter as long as it's in good condition, but you need to be able to buy parts for it. Top ends and things like that cost more in KTMs. It's worth it, but if you end up with a basket case you'll spend more than you'll ever get out of it. I love mine. They are great trail machines--mine has incredible power. I don't know how the 125s compare but they will have more bottom end than a mx 125. Good luck!
 
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#13
Firecracker22- a 95 isn't old, especially when the bike is still a current model, early 80s and 70s is getting kind of old.

BlinkMe7182- Go for the KTM125E/XC. The E/XCs are great bikes, I would gladly ride one. Unless you are a complete wimp, you should be able to ride the XR250R. The XR250R is easier to ride that any 125. I can ride a 250 and I'm not exactly your macho person. If you are only riding trails, I would probably take the Xr. Good luck on a bike.
 

firecracker22

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#14
Old is relative. My XR was a 93, and so is my pickup, and for someone who didn't own a car younger than she is until last year that's pretty new. But a 6, almost 7, year old bike is getting up there. Especially since a lot of people buy a new bike every year! I can't imagine that myself but if you race hard, things wear out fast. KTM has made a lot of changes in the last few years. I would worry about parts availability. But it's still a great bike, and a step up from an 80. You know, MX 125s aren't that bad; there's times I wish I were on a YZ but then there's times I'm glad I have my bike. Keep your options open, Blinkme, and ride as many as you can get your hands on.
 
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#15
Originally posted by firecracker22 :
"95 is old for a bike, which shouldn't matter as long as it's in good condition"

<silly old man mode on>
uh, o.k., i think i can hold back........maybe <eyes watering>......oh heck....
ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha h a ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha !!!!
95? old? heck is it even broken in yet?? :p :p
i can still get plenty of stuff for my'82 yet.
in fact some items my local dealer had IN STOCK.
sitting on the shelf.
old?? hmmmm maybe when we're talking 1960-something.......
<silly old man mode off>