RECENT POSTS

Brake Use

Joined
Nov 13, 2006
Messages
22
Likes
0
#1
ok, so, me and my friend were having an argument about which brake should be used more front, back, or equal. i know that which brake you use depends on where you are and all that but given a straight line i said that to stop fastest, you should use about 75% front, 25% back to stop fastest. He said that as a general rule of thumb, you should use the back brake quite a bit more often than the front. :coocoo: i disagree, and so please help and decide once and for all who is right. plz reply! ;)
 
Joined
Apr 12, 2007
Messages
170
Likes
0
#2
It all depends on terrain, and speed. From what I've noticed if you wanna stop really fast, slam on the rear first all the way, then half-3/4th the front brake. Actually sliding the bike sideways stops you pretty quick too.

In a staight line, I tend to apply the front a little (1/4), then the rear all the way(100%), then the front some more until I stop (1/2-100%)... I also shift my weight as far back on the bike as possible without letting go of the brakes or clutch. So in that regard I'd say rear 60% front 40% but sometimes it'll go rear 80 front 20, or even front 90 rear 10... it all depends on terrain.

Grass: 40:60 (front to rear)
Sand: 40:60-50:50 depending on pack
Gravel: 40:60-50:50
Tar: 20:80
Mud: 50:50-30:70 depending on depth/speed

In some cases if you use them both equally then you're defeating the purpose of a back brake considering you'll just endo regarless. I think this is why the general rule is to tap the rear first as to avoid flying over the bars.

Again, it all depends on your style, the terrain, your speed, and your ability.

Maybe someone else will have a little more insight.

Dan
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 12, 2007
Messages
170
Likes
0
#4
Front... hence why it's a catch 22 in how you use it. It also depends on if you're running disc/drum rear brakes.

Disc grab harder and smoother than drum, so balance becomes an issue.

If you nail the front too hard, you'll dig in or spill over... hence why I would think it best to control your stop with the front rather than retain your stop with it.. leave that up to the rear.

Gratned, this is different for every bike/rider/etc... Harley riders rarely use their front brakes unless it's on the highway or on long-stops. Crotch-rocket riders barely touch their back brakes... from there-on, it's everything in between.

I personally ride as the rule states, rear first.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Messages
2,142
Likes
1
#5
I do a lot of trail riding, you have to assume there is a supprise around every turn. On entry, I generally ride 50/50 front and rear on the brakes. This way, I always have some stopping power in reserve. Should I need more stopping power, I'll gradually increase pressure on the front and lift a little on the rear. I'd say 75/25 gives you about the best braking with some control left over. When single tracking and standing, I generally work the rear brake only which leaves my right hand free to work the throttle and handle bars. Coming down steep hills, I ride the rear brake the whole way down no matter what comes up. I use the front brake to control my speed. When the really steep stuff comes up, you have to let go of the front brake but the rear brake always stays on. While braking in a turn, I generally use the rear brake a little more. I'm steering off the front and can't risk locking up that wheel.
 
Joined
Apr 18, 2006
Messages
1,534
Likes
8
#6
I would say that I am pretty close to 76....

The front wheel definately has more braking potential because the weight transfers to the front wheel on a stop. You tend to stop pretty darn fast when you lock the front wheel and it flips you over the handle bars, a very real possibility when going down a hill.

More often than not staying in control is preferred over stopping fast. If you lock your front wheel, you have no control.

To expand a little bit on what 76 said: going down a steep hill: You sure don't want to lock the front, but locking the rear can slide you sideways and really mess you up. Downshift to a low gear, let the engine drag hold you back. Feather the rear brake to keep the engine RPMs down but don't hit the brake so hard that the rear wheel locks. Apply front brake only as needed.

Rod
 

IndyMX

Crash Test Dummy
Joined
Jul 18, 2006
Messages
5,546
Likes
1
Location
Amo, IN
#7
rmc_olderthandirt said:
Downshift to a low gear, let the engine drag hold you back. Feather the rear brake to keep the engine RPMs down but don't hit the brake so hard that the rear wheel locks. Apply front brake only as needed.

Rod

I agree with only one small caveat.. 2 strokes really don't have much for engine braking.
 
Joined
Oct 19, 2006
Messages
2,142
Likes
1
#8
I usually just let the motor stall as I start the decent down the hill so I don't have to worry about keeping it running. I'm talking really steep hills, the kind you can't stop on, just limit how quickly you accelerate.