Torquing Triple Clamp Tube Bolts

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#1
I have always had a question in torquing the two bolts clamping the fork tube to the triple clamps. When you tighten one of the two bolts to the proper foot pounds, the other bolt (upon rechecking) appears to loose it's torque. Vice-versa on retightening. If you bring them both up gently they seem to have a considerable amount of torque. I am concerned with pinching the fork tube. How can you achieve the proper torque on both bolts at the same time?
 
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#2
I've wondered the same thing at times. But I havent pinched a tube yet and my specs are for 20ft lbs. I've heard of some people cranking them to oblivion. Yikes!!

I re tap the holes and keep the the bolt threads cleaned up from time to time. This seems to allow them to torque up sooner.

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Vester
96 RM250
"Let's see if an "A" rider tries it first.."
 

MikeT

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#3
Well, I always do the little by little method. If your spec is 20 ft pounds, then tighten each to around 10, then 15, then 18, then 20. Once you hit 20 on one, then tighten the other until it gets snug. It's a finesse' thing. Don't over tighten!!
 

zsr

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#4
Mikes advise is probably right. I used to set the wrench to the recommended 14ib and tighten the lower bolts alternately until they were tight. However this made the forks bind on a 98 CR125.

Thinking I'd learnt a lesson, I then started to tighten one bolt, then the other, then leave it. First lap the forks slipped thru and jammed against the bars......

Finesse.....good word.



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98 CR125 01 CR250 99YZF R1

Thanks to: Motorex / D.I.D. / Vesrah / YES Helmets
 

MikeT

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#5
Why, Thank you zsr!
 

zsr

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#6
Indisputably a pleasure old chap.

:)



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98 CR125 01 CR250 99YZF R1

Thanks to: Motorex / D.I.D. / Vesrah / YES Helmets
 
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#7
These guys het the nail on the head.Tighten the bolts slowly,evenly,and consistantly until the correct torque is applied.You do haver to be careful since we are talking about only 14 to 17lbs of touque.

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it dont hurt till the bone shows.

2001 YZ 250
 

MotoEnduro

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#8
how can you tell if the fork is 'pinched'? I tighten the bolts little by little until the spec is reached. but my forks feel notchy and not very smooth especially in the inital travel. maybe this is the problem?
 

Saratoga

#9
Also, lube the bolts so that there is not a false reading due to metal to metal binding. Believe it or not the lube actually helps in bolts backing out. Something I learned from Scott Summers.
 
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#10
Moto,
Depending of the type of fork you have you just might have a problem.KYB forks feel more plush than showa fork.Reason being during the first few inches of travel the KYB fork will cavitate the oil this causes the fork to feel plush.The Showa fork does not cavitate and for this reason the fork feels more harsh.

You might need to change the fork oil.this usually makes a nice difference.As far as pinching the fork tubes I dont think that this is a problem unless you have applied way to much torque.Suspension is not something that is easly adjusted or set.Just take your time and dont make to many adjustments at once so you can tell if what you are doing is helping or hendering your effert.Gook Luck :)

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it dont hurt till the bone shows.

2001 YZ 250
 
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#11
Saratoga:

To much lube, such as grease, will also affect the applied torque. The lube can effectively increase the load being exerted on the fasteners due to the cushioning effect it has between the metals. An old sage machinist once described this to me as "soft" torquing. Use a light oil on fasteners that are in critical areas such as barrel to case, head, forks, etc. Everywhere else you can get away with grease.


[This message has been edited by Dirthead (edited 04-06-2001).]
 

Saratoga

#12
Dirthead: You articulated your thought very clearly but I honestly do not understand what you are saying. How can lube increase a load on a nut or bolt?
 

clw

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#13
Saratoga:

It reduces friction.

Try this in the shower. With dry hands press your palms together and try to twist your hands in opposite directions, then soap up your hands and try again. The effort you exerted in each instance is torque. Much less effort (torque) was required the second time to accomplish the same task. The lubrication did its job, displacing ever so slightly your palms.

I was taught by my grandfather, an old time school bus mechanic, that greasing bolts would result in over torquing. Read, could cause your forks to bind. So, I concur with dirthead.

And, be sure your forks are not binding as they compress, assure they are parallel to each other by leaving the axle clamps loose and pushing the forks through their travel to center them before tightening.