F-250 V-10 V.S F-250 V-8 diesel ?

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#1
Ok i have narrowed it down to these two or so models and I have less than a week to choose. I am pulling anywhere from 4,000-6,500 pounds 5 days a week..unless you count racing then its 6 days a week. So my little f-150 does not like pulling this weight seing that it has allready thrashed a trans and its a 2000 model f-150. anywho my choices are the v-10 or the v-8 turbo diesel ? I will be pulling my loads from 9-5 and after 5 in the afternoon I do alot of stop and go driving. Like my g/f likes to take my truck currently to the mall and stuff so I will need this truck to be able to do some top and go traffic I have had several guys tell me that the turbo diesel engine makes the truck sluggish and it dosent want to pick up speed like a small v-6 that I allready have . Is that true ? and which out of these two vehicles will get the better gas mileage the v-10 gas or the v-8 diesel ? my 2000 f-150 with the small 4.2 ltr v-6 is getting around 4-8 mpg when pulling and 10-14 mpg on the road when not pulling . And does anyone know the pulling specs on the v-10 and diesel v-8? for any of you truck guys any info would be great
 

HAzE

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#2
hmm.....

Well...Triton™ engines deliver outstanding horsepower and torque and can stand up to the demands of everyday life(deisel).I couldn't find any information about the v-10 you're talking about, I didn't even know ford made a v-10. You can try their website at www.ford.com Well sorry I can't help, but I tried. Later.
 
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#3
I have a 2000 F250 Crewcab 4x4 with the diesel and love it. I get anywhere from 12 - 14 miles a gallon pulling my 14' enclosed trailer and empty somewhere around 15 - 17. Don't expect that kind of gas mileage from the gas hog V10, you would be lucky to get 10 - 12 miles a gallon pulling empty.

Yes, the diesel is no race car, but expect engine life to be anywhere from 180 -250,000 miles if you take care of it. You do need to wait for it to warm up and then let it cool down 5 minutes before killing the engine to let the turbo cool down. Engine oil capacity is 15 quarts. I use Shell Rotela T 15w-40 and change every 5,000 miles.

Order the truck fully loaded and get the trailer tow package with the hitch. Its a well designed hitch and most of it is hidden. You can email me if you want any more info at RICKM7331@aol.com

Good luck
 

HGilliam

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#4
Trailer Life magazine did a comparision between the Ford v10 and the powerstroke last year. I'll sum it up for you: V10 pluses, cost less to buy and maintain, minuses : less fuel milage and pulling power ie: torque. Powerstroke pluses: more torque and better fuel milage. Minuses: cost more to buy and maintain. The crossover point is at 100,000 miles. Above this the powerstroke becomes cheaper to own, below this the V10 is cheaper to own.
Basically it becomes how long you keep a vehicle determines which is the least expensive to own and operate.

Hope this helps

Howard
 
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#5
I had an F-150 supercab with a 5.4L V8 and just made the decision you have before you....

I went diesel. Gas in California is .20 gal more than diesel most of the time, I'm getting 17 mph doing 75 down the hwy with a F-350 Powerstoke CrewCab 4X4 long bed full of people and bikes. The diesels have come a long ways...they aren't going to win any stoplight drags but they get down the road great!;)

Check out www.ford-diesel.com for everything you could ever want to know about the ford diesel trucks. Also checkout www.eaa.com and check on the "Ford" link and read about the Ford partners program....if you like saving money! ;)
 

SPD

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#6
I have a dodge with a v-10. The reason I choose the v-10 over the diesel was I listen to a diesel 9 to 10 hrs a day and I've learned to hate them. When I step on the gas I want to go somewhere not chugalog along in a big cloud of smoke. I don't drive my truck a lot so the gas is no big deal to me. Last I checked was a year ago on vacation I got 13 mpg loaded with camping gear and driving 70-75 mph. If I was driving the truck everyday a bunch of miles or going to keep it for more than 5 years I'd get the diesel.
 
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#7
Yeah I put on anywhere from 30,000-45,000 miles a year on my truck. What kind of extra maintnence does the Diesel have ? and why after 100,000 does the Diesel become cheaper to own. ? I know nothing about hp to tq ratios but here is the difference in the two can anyone translate ?
01 powerstroke diesel 250 hp 505 ft pds tq.
01 triton v-10 gas 310 hp 425 ft. pds tq.
I plan on keeping the vehicle for somewere around the 3-4 year mark and by then I should have around 120,000 miles on it. If the v-10 would pull my 5,000 pound trailer and get me respectable gas milage (better than now) and not break down like a typical gas truck. Then I would go with it but from what i heard it dosent pull heavy loads with the ease that the Diesel does and it will crap out on me before the 100,000 mile mark.
 

nikki

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#8
We went Powerstroke shopping last year - and got a '00 F-250 Powerstroke Lariat 4x4 Extended Cab Long Bed. I wold DEFINATELY recommend spending the extra $4k for the Powerstroke!!

Ours gets 10-14 mpg pulling a pretty heavy 24 foot enclosed trailer and it gets 16-20 mpg empty. From what I hear - a V10 gets 4-6 pulling and 8-12 empty. And around here - diesel is cheaper than gas at most places, too. It was funny - when truck shopping, we ran across quite a few used '99 and '00 V10's and NO used Powerstrokes.

The Powerstroke will become cheaper to own after 100k miles because you will save a LOT of money in gas (at $1.50 a gallon and a 8 mpg average - 100k miles will cost $18,750; at $1.50 a gallon and a 14 mpg average - 100k miles will cost $10,715 = $8,035 savings), but spend more for oil changes for the diesel, but - most importantly (to me) - you will get more miles out of a diesel after 100k and a much higher re-sale value if you sell the two at any time - especially at or above 100k miles.


Here is my Goods and Bads of the two:

Powerstroke:

Good - mpg, torque, 100k mile warranty, should last a good 150k-300k miles, MUCH better re-sale value!!

Bad - costs $4k more, expensive oil changes, need to plug in overnight during the winter, sometimes hard to find diesel late at night on the way to a track :confused:

V10:

Good - $4k less, cheaper oil changes, more HP, more get up and go

Bad - GAS HOG, harder to re-sell, miles hurt more than miles on diesel, may not last as long as diesel
 

Highbeam

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#9
kinda long

My first question for Hgilliam about the 100,000 mile break even point would be does it account for the increased trade in value of the truck? This can be more than 2000 bucks.

The diesel's extra maintenance is not extreme. The powerstroke requires 3 times as much of a somewhat special oil, but you really just need to be religious about the maintenance schedule. If you buy it new, a service contract can be bought where every service item is taken care of and the dealer will sign off on every maintenance interval. This "book" of proven maintenance will help with resale value and any warranty claims and simplify your end of maintenance. I would recommend it.

The 100,000 mile point should be where the extra cost for the diesel engine, about 4500$, is refunded to the owner by the lesser operating costs, it's cheaper to run because of mpg. I think resale value should also be taken into account.

The way I would explain torque vs. horsepower is that horsepower is what gets you from 0 to 60 quickly, torque is what maintains 60 while heading up a steep hill. The diesel's power (torque and hp) can be increased by using aftermarket mods. But be careful, you may get addicted to increasing power.

If you really do tow as much as you say and you plan on going 120,000 miles in 4 years I would say it's a no-brainer, go with the diesel. Expect 18-21 mpg with the new diesel and an automatic with four wheel drive towing or not. 12-8 with the v10, I understand these thing are real hogs.

Now here's the problem, the diesel is noisy and has a stink to the exhaust. If more than just a haze of smoke is visible under substantial acceleration than something is broken and the dealer will fix it. These new diesels don't smoke like the old ones. The rattle is great for some guys but too loud for me, really you can't order food at the drive through with it running. The smell is not different from any other diesel, but it's different enough from gas exhaust to make you a bit nauseous. You should get used to and even learn to appreciate these "problems" when you feel the power and see the mpg numbers.

You may not be interested, but I would consider the duramax/allison combination sold by Chevrolet. This engine makes more than 300 horsepower and is oh so quiet. I would also recommend test driving all three. This is not a cheap truck, you should be able to know what you're getting.

Good luck. Did I say GET THE DIESEL yet? I guess that's the bottom line.:D
 
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#10
In extreme winter weather, I usually plug in my Powerstroke diesel block heater and have the timer kick on about 3 - 4 hours before I start it and then it only takes about 5 - 10 minutes before its at normal operating temperature, so I never leave mine plugged in all night. We have 5 diesel farm tractors and I do the same thing with them. One time I did forget to plug it in and even at 15 degrees below zero, the glow plugs did an excellant job and fired the truck right out. It took about 15 - 20 minutes before it finally warmed up.

Mine is very quiet at highway speed. Yes its alittle more noisier at lower speeds.

Diesel fuel around the KCMO area is about 15 - 20 cents cheaper than gas and you do have to look alittle harder for diesel, but on a 800 mile trip, I found diesel at 1/2 the gas stations and you can always find a truck stop on any interstate. You might have to pay a little more for diesel at a regular gas station over a truck stop.

I have almost 36,000 on my 2000 F250 and I wouldn't trade it for anything.

I would also be very careful about the new Chevy diesel. I would never buy anything that was just developed as they always have defects and manufacture corrections during their first two years of production.
 
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#11
v-10

I have a 99 model F-250 V-10 extended cab, short bed. I currently have 50,000miles on my truck and have been quite pleased with it. There are two reasons I didn't buy a Powerstroke. First, they were expensive and second I wanted quicker off the line performance. My truck gets about 14-15mpg. This is the same mileage my dad gets in his F-250 with the 5.4L V-8. I don't know what my truck mileage is pulling a load as I have never checked. If you want to know just how long my truck will last, check back with me in a couple of years, as I plan on keeping it till it is about dead. I don't pull trailers every day. If you do, the powerstroke might be better for you. I knew that I would be pulling loads some and I wanted a truck that would do it but at the same time be a pleasure to drive when I wasn't. I like the V-10 a lot. It is the smoothest engine I have ever had. No vibration from it what so ever. There is a lot of performance potential there too. I installed a K&N filter on mine and that made a noticeble difference. I can only imagine what exhaust mods and the like would do.
 

NVR FNSH

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#12
I beg to differ regarding diesels requiring a somewhat 'special' (read more expensive) oil. I drive a Dodge Cummins - 11qt oil changes. I use Valvoline Premium Blue 15W-40 oil - ~$6.00/gallon (yes, gallon). So I'm paying $1.50/qt - sounds about like 'standard' gas engine oil to me. Oh yeah - I buy it at Kragen's (Checkers/Schuck's in other parts of the country I think).

About the only 'additional' maintenance required on my diesel is changing the fuel filter every 15k miles. Big deal - takes ~10 minutes.

Over ~30k miles I'm seeing a combined city/hwy 15.8 MPG - lots of stop & go with a 6spd stick and quite a bit of +75mph/400 mile road trips.

Brian
 

KXTodd

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#13
Re: v-10

Originally posted by alstroker
My truck gets about 14-15mpg. This is the same mileage my dad gets in his F-250 with the 5.4L V-8. .
That's pretty good mileage! What's the power feel like compared to your v-10? I've got 2 trucks with the 5.4 and they're great , if I ever get around to buying a new truck it will be another 5.4, I occasionally pull about 3-4000 lbs and loads of 1-2000 and they handle it no problem. I can't stand them stinky loud a@* diesels
:confused:
Although I'm hoping to get an Isuzu or Mitshi diesel dump soon for work, I usually won't be driving this one though:D
 

bwalker

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#14
A Ford or Dodge diesel with a few simple mods(chips)will leave a triton v-10 in the dust. The v-10 is somewhat of a dog stock and due to its smaller cylinder size doesnt have the torque of a v-8. Even stock a powerstroke is no slouch and will get way better MPG than a v-10.
 
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#15
If the V-10 is a dog stock, then why would your diesels need a chip and other upgrades to blow the V-10 away? My V-10 produces 410 ft-lbs of torque. The 5.4L V-8 is not even close. The diesels do produce more torque stock; That is expected. There is no way that a (stock) diesel is going to out drag a (stock) V-10 gas engine in a straight line. Diesels don't build rpm quickly enough and they redline much earlier than gas engines. Enough said. Both engines are good. You have to determine what is more important to you: More pulling power or better acceleration. Opinions may also vary with a particular vehicle. My dads Ford V-8 doesn't run nearly as well as some others I know with the same engine. Probably because of some variations in manufacturing.